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ENERGY

How to propel the world without destroying it is one of the most difficult challenges of future decades. Systems grow in size and complexity, becoming larger and unpredictable challenges and their impacts, but also are increasing and becoming increasingly viable energetic alternatives we have to satisfy the different demands such as mobility, communications, cities and industries. A variety of organizations and studies show that it is already running a significant change in power grids of different regions of the world (World Energy Council).

A key aspect to respond to this challenge is the growing information we have about them and the ability to use that information to improve modes of demand, supply growth strategies and the management of energy in our society. The capture, management and intelligent analysis of that information based on intelligent algorithms is the key to increase the rational and efficient use of energy and here are some examples of how to do so.

LABS

CLIMATE AND ENERGY

In 2020 20% of the energy consumed will come from renewable energies. Particularly, in the case of Belgium, this country should contribute in an order of 13% of its energy consumption in order to achieve the common european goal for renewable sources of energy.

USE OF BIOMASS AS AN ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SOURCE IN THERMAL POWER PLANTS

Is it possible to consider biomass as an alternative energy source to replace fossil fuels which have a greater environmental impact? How do technological developments impact on the competitiveness of biomass energy? Can we consider this alternative in order to supply existing thermal power plants in regions with deficient provision and with biomass availability, or for private industries? In this Lab we explore all elements that illustrate the great potential of this alternative energy source.

WATER AND NON-CONVENTIONAL ENERGY SOURCES (FRACKING) IN ARGENTINA

Argentina has the second world reserve of shale gas behind China and the fourth shale oil behind Russia, the US and China. At the same time the country faces a significant structural energy deficit estimated at 3% of GDP which represents a restriction on the growth estimated for the upcoming years. Thus, these non-conventional energy sources seem a viable and strategic alternative for the country to explore. However, what potential environmental impacts related to water and climate change does this methodology imply?